Is Bergoglio an antipope with a mission?

It is one thing after another with Pope Bergoglio. The thought the Catholic Church has a antipope, or non-Catholic pope, or protestant pope (take your pick) is becoming difficult to resist. It is claimed, for example, that he says Jesus of Nazareth was not God. What? What were we doing for 2,000 years? Steve Skojec of OnePeterFive comments.

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Scalfari, Friend of Francis, Claims Pope Believes Jesus Was “Not a God At All”

Steve Skojec, 1P5

Amidst the raging debate over what was at best a syncretistic (and at worst an overtly pagan) opening ceremony for the Amazon Synod, an early push for ending clerical celibacy from Cardinal Hummes, cringe-inducing virtue-signaling from members of the Catholic media, and the jaw-dropping brazenness of a key synod organizer — Bishop Erwin Kräutler — openly supporting women’s ordination, a bomb has been dropped that has overtaken even the wildly controversial opening days of the synod itself.

According to papal friend and repeat interviewer Eugenio Scalfari of La Repubblica, Pope Francis told the Italian atheist that he believes that “Jesus of Nazareth, once he became a man, though a man of exceptional virtues, was not a God at all.” (“Sono la prova provata che Gesù di Nazareth una volta diventato uomo, sia pure un uomo di eccezionali virtù, non era affatto un Dio.”)

The editorial itself, published on October 8, can viewed in Italian at La Repubblica. It is currently behind a paywall. Our translation of the section in question is provided by Giuseppe Pellegrino:

Pope Francis has never spoken of the Ego as the determining element of man. Whoever has had, as I have several times, the fortune of meeting him and speaking to him with the maximum cultural trust, knows that Pope Francis conceives of the Christ as Jesus of Nazareth, man, not God incarnate. Once he has become incarnate, Jesus ceases to be a God and becomes a man up until his death on the cross. The proof that confirms this reality and that creates a Church that is completely different from others is proven by several episodes that are worth recalling.

The first is what happened in the Garden of Gethsemane, where Jesus went after the Last Supper. The apostles, who were just a few meters away from him, heard him pray to God with words that were in time reported by Simon Peter: “Lord,” said Jesus, “if you can take this bitter chalice away from me, I pray that you do it, but if you cannot or you do not want to I will drink it to the last drop.” He was arrested as soon as he left the garden by the guards of Pilate.

Another episode that is also well-known took place when Jesus was already crucified and there one more time he repeated and was heard by the apostles and the women who were kneeling at the foot of the cross: “Lord, you have abandoned me.” When I had the opportunity to discuss these phrases with Pope Francis, he said to me: “They are the proven proof that Jesus of Nazareth, once he became man, was simply a man of exceptional virtue, he was not quite [affatto] a God.”

Those familiar with the controversy over the pope’s various interviews with Scalfari, none of which have ever been corrected — and some of which have been published in official Vatican outlets — will recognize a well trod pattern here.

Read the rest here…