Category Archives: Catholic Church

Pope Apostate – pictures and actions don’t lie

Pope Francis greets homosexual activist appointed to Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors

Doug Mainwaring, June 21 2021

VATICAN CITY, June 21, 2021 (LifeSiteNews) – On Saturday Pope Francis greeted Juan Carlos Cruz, an openly homosexual man whom he appointed to the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors earlier this year at the Vatican. Cruz is himself a victim of clerical sexual abuse.

“Today I thanked Pope Francis for my appointment and reaffirmed my commitment to continue helping survivors of sexual abuse around the world,” said Cruz in a Tweet on Saturday.  

Pope Francis has repeatedly delivered mixed signals, often seeming to significantly depart from Church teaching regarding the pastoring of individuals afflicted with homosexuality and transgenderism.  

Over the course of his pontificate, Pope Francis has given indications that he is not concerned with addressing homosexual activity according to Church teaching as inherently disordered and intrinsically evil. In the last few years, he has signalled support for legal recognition of same-sex unionswelcomed a former male student and his boyfriend to the Vatican’s U.S. embassy; and a French priest said in a televised interview that Pope Francis approved of his blessing of homosexual couples

Read the rest here…

Historical vision of Archbishop Lefebvre

This film, in French, (see HERE) shows an interview with the great Archbishop Lefebvre defending the traditional Church of the millennia. It is only in recent years that it is has become frighteningly clear how right and prophetic the archbishop was. But could even he have imagined that by 2021 the prospect of female ordination would be staring the Church in the face? Could he have imagined a pope in the vanguard to such radical change? Perhaps he did. Perhaps his vision was so clear that he saw it in the distance if the dissenters were not contained. Equally it is becoming obvious that the SSPX presents the last line of defence against the heretical assault on the Mass of the ages.

The uncompromising Cardinal Pell

Below is a LifeSiteNews report on a wide-ranging interview Cardinal George Pell gave to EWTN’s Colom Flynn. There are three important features of this report.

First, Cardinal Pell shows how strong and forthright he is in his defence of Catholic doctrine. People will not like what he says, he admits, but that does not bother him. His duty is to defend the Catholic Church against attacks from within and without. His manly strength and resolve is the reason he has so much support inside and outside the Church.

Second, his manly strength and resolve is the reason he has so many enemies. Those enemies led by hate-filled Louise Milligan and the billion-dollar government funded Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) got up a lynch mob to perpetrate perhaps the greatest failure ever of Australia’s legal system, so great is their hatred of him for his political and religious views. Those clerics in the Church who joined the Pell lynch mob should fill all decent people with disgust.

Third, perhaps not unconnected to the Pell lynching, is the state of the Catholic Church in Germany. It is precisely the doctrinally corrupted German Church that Cardinal Pell is so outspoken about. At the present measure, as the cardinal describes it, the Church in Germany is de facto protestantized. It prompts me to wonder what it is about the Germans.

Luther led a successful revolt in doctrine and establishment against the Catholic Church. Then we have the destructive philosophies of Marx, Heidegger, Nietsche and a dozen others, leading to the Frankfurt School whose thought is laying waste Western Civilization. Of course, we cannot forget the Germans started two world Wars. Is it to exaggerate to claim that two Germans (Marx and Hitler) led the conflagration of the 20th century?

Cardinal Pell: German bishops’ duty is to ‘uphold the teachings of the Church’

‘I think that there is a percentage of the German church which seems to be resolutely heading in the wrong direction.’

Michael Haynes, 30 April 2021

VATICAN CITY, April 30, 2021 (LifeSiteNews) — In a newly released interview, Australian Cardinal George Pell has issued a warning to dissident German clergy, describing their opposition to the perennial teaching of the Church as “ominous,” and stating that it is the “duty of the German bishops to uphold the teachings of Scripture” and the Church.

Cardinal Pell, now aged 79, sat down with EWTN’s Colm Flynn to discuss the second volume of his prison journal. The wide ranging interview, aired on April 27, covered Pell’s 405 days in prison after having been unjustly convicted of child sexual abuse, as well as issues in the Catholic Church today.

One of those prominent topics was the state of the Church in Germany, described by the former prefect of the Vatican’s Secretariat for the Economy as “ominous.”

Read the rest here…

A look at a traditional seminary

Six weeks ago I posted a video ‘A Day in the Life of a Seminarian. ‘ It depicted daily life in a seminary of the Society of St Pius X (SSPX). I made the comment that an SSPX seminarian’s daily activities was little different from a pre-Vatican II seminary. I can speak from experience, having attended a junior seminary 1959-1962. Below is a second video put out by the SSPX, providing a tour of St Thomas Aquinas Seminary. It gives further insight into the daily life of a traditional seminarian.

These two videos also provide a handy background to my novel TIMES OF DISTRESS: A STORY OF UNSWERVING FAITH AND COMMITMENT. The intrigue of the first six chapters takes place in a Dutch seminary in 1940.

‘Lead us not into temptation’ – an explanation

It was reported recently that Pope Francis changed some wording in the ‘Lord’s Prayer’, The Our Father. It seems an extraordinary thing to do after centuries of the particular wording he objected to. It is even stranger that an explanation of the translation from the Greek to the English is laid out in the Catechism of the Catholic. Do he and his advisors not read the Church’s documents on such an important matter. Dr Pitre of Catholic Productions explicates the meaning of ‘Lead us not into temptation.’

Feelings die not in silence

DUE JULY 2021

THE STORY

It is January 1957. Without warning, Virginia Pearson breaks her engagement to academic Philip Stevenson to enter the convent of the Suffering Saviour. She says she has an irresistible calling. Philip is devastated. Though living up to the responsibilities of his academic position, he slides into depression, too much drink, and a series of short-term relationships.

Virginia makes friends with the beautiful self-effacing Aine O’Riordan who enters the convent at the same time. Strange inexplicable happenings torment the sensitive and withdrawn Aine. Virginia tries to comfort her, but Aine’s anxiety forces her out of the convent. She leaves Virginia behind to deal with an atmosphere of foreboding that seems to infect the life of the convent. (Descent into Hades: A Spiritual Journey, Book 3 of the Conciliar series relates what happens to Aine.)

Virginia, now Sister Agnes, is suspicious of fellow postulant Margaret McGuigan, now Sister Catherine, and her manipulative ways. She wonders about her role in the communal infection. Agnes barely suppresses her suspicion and antagonism toward Catherine through their religious training to their university course in 1962.

But the privilege of attending university brings fresh problems for Sister Agnes. Philosophy lecturer Phil Stevenson leads her tutorial group. It does not take long for them to realize their relationship has not ended, despite Agnes’s supreme efforts to keep Philip at bay.

The dark events in the convent, the leftist bullying on campus, the conflict with furtive, manipulative Sister Catherine, and her love for Philip have her rushing toward a crisis in which she acts out of character.

FEELINGS DIE NOT IN SILENCE is Book 2 of the Conciliar Series.

The themes of the ‘Goddess’, neo-paganism, the occult and Gnosticism are a thread through the story.  The Second Vatican Council and the cultural revolution of the 1960s and 1970s (1965-1975) are the background to the Conciliar series.

Series title: The Conciliar Series.

Who emptied the Church after Vatican II?

This is an interesting review of an interesting book. The key proposition in the book is that powerful factors outside the Second Vatican Council were the efficient cause of the Church’s collapse and not the council documents themselves, despite the shameless leftist political agitation in the council’s session. Fr Jennings writes that historian of religion Callum Brown observed:

For organised Christianity, the sixties constituted the most concentrated period of crisis since the Reformation; but what was at stake became perceived as the very survival of Christian society and values. In this respect certainly, the sixties may turn out to have been more important than even the Renaissance and Reformation. (p. 135)

I lived through the 1960s as a young adult and I can well believe it. The cultural revolution turned everything on its head. I look closely at the student radical activity at Sydney University in my book TONY ABBOTT AND THE TIMES OF REVOLUTION.

*****

Why have all the Catholics gone?

A masterful examination of historical, moral and theological factors in the diminution of the Catholic Church in the UK and US after Vatican II.

by Fr Gavan JenningsMar 11, 2021

Mass Exodus: Catholic disaffiliation in Britain and America since Vatican II
by Stephen Bullivant, Oxford University Press, 2019, 309 pp

Stephen Bullivant is Professor of Theology and the Sociology of Religion, and Director of the Benedict XVI Centre for Religion and Society. He holds doctorates in Theology (Oxford, 2009) and Sociology (Warwick, 2019). He has written several books on the Catholic faith, the loss of faith, and atheism.

The book is essentially a dispassionate, intensely scholarly examination of the question whether the unprecedented “mass exodus” of Catholics from the Church since the 1960s is a direct consequence, as many believe, of the reforms inaugurated by Vatican Council II (1962-’65).

Bullivant begins his investigation by looking at one of the great aims of the Council: to stir the lay faithful of the Church from passivity and insularity and to waken in them their baptismal call to holiness and apostolate. Instead, the Council appears to have succeeded only in having the faithful disaffiliate as never before in Church history.

From this unprecedented falling away in the years following the Council, it is tempting to draw the inference: post concilium, ergo propter concilium (after the Council, therefore because of the Council). And so “One of the primary purposes of this monograph is to investigate whether, how, and to what extent that implication is true — at least, in Britain and the USA” ( p. 12).

Read the rest here…

Response to Bishop Barron’s criticism of Traditionalists

In this letter addressed to Bishop Barron of the WORD ON FIRE ministry, Fr Cipolla rightly focuses on what the Mass has become since the Second Vatican Council and the mighty cultural pressures surrounding it. Was the Council more of a political contest than a religious one?

*****

“A Response to Bp. Barron’s Criticism of Traditionalism”: You can’t Evangelize the Revolutionized World With a New Mass Locked in the 1960s Revolution — A Letter by Fr. Cipolla

Rorate Caeli, 10 March 202

Dear Bishop Barron:

I have written many Letters to the Editor in my lifetime to the New York Times and to the Wall Street Journal—bona fide credentials of my moderate and centrist persona—and now I feel compelled to write this letter to you to respond to your recent article called “The Evangelical Path of Word on Fire”. I am a Catholic priest, soon to be an octogenarian. It would seem more prudent at this time in my life to lay aside those things that threaten the peace and equanimity that one should strive for at this stage of my life. But alas, my Southern Italian genetic makeup does not make it easy to live a laid- back life at this time when I should give oneself over to contemplation and remembrance of things past.

I have followed your career in the Church for some years now, with a good deal of admiration for your stand against what you call liberal Catholicism.  St. John Henry Newman, that great opponent of liberalism in religion, would approve of your battle against “beige Catholicism”.  Your many instructional DVDs show clearly that you understand the important role of Beauty in the Catholic faith.  You are obviously of man of real faith who loves the Church.

Your brief article refers to two types of Catholics that manifest themselves at this time and that you consider to be aberrant, for very different reasons, from your understanding of Catholicism , which you speak about as Evangelical Catholicism. The first is “liberal Catholicism”, which has predominated since the years after the Second Vatican Council.  You describe this type of Catholicism as “culturally accommodating…unsure of itself..a Church that had allowed its distinctive colors to be muted and its sharp edges to be dulled.”  You agree that, in the words of Cardinal George, that liberal Catholicism is “a spent project”.

Read the rest here…

A day in the life of a Traditional seminary

The St Aquinas Seminary is the seminary of the Society of Saint Pius X (SSPX) in America. The SSPX is an order of priests whose purpose is to guard the content of the Catholic faith by preserving and promoting the traditional Latin rites and the traditional unadulterated priesthood. A few years back, they posted a video which shows what daily life is like for an SSPX seminarian: A Day in the Life of a Seminarian – St Thomas Aquinas Seminary.

It gives an intriguing picture of seminary training before the radical changes to the priesthood that followed the Second Vatican Council. I speak from experience. From 1959 to 1962, I attended a junior seminary in Australia. The routine of that junior seminary was pretty much the same as that depicted here in America in 2016.

Recommended viewing.

Moving towards a Feminist Church?

On The Bridge, the blog of the National Centre for Evangelisation, one finds this post: The Women of the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference. The unidentified author does indeed talk about the women of the Australian Catholic Bishop’s conference, but central is the boast below:

For many decades now, we have known that women make up the majority of those attending Mass and participating in parish ministries. Data from the 2016 National Church Life Survey shows that women hold 65 per cent of all leadership and ministry roles in parishes. These roles include lectors, special ministers of the Eucharist, leaders of prayer, youth or discussion groups, members of parish councils and so on. Overall, 42% of women who are part of parish life have a leadership role, compared with 38% of men. Recent data from Catholic dioceses reveal that significant percentages of women also have roles as chairs (56%) and members (45%) of pastoral councils and as members of safeguarding councils (49%).[1]

The contribution of women is not only limited to voluntary roles in parishes. Within the Church, there are over 3000 organisations that employ more than 220,000 people, and 77 per cent of these roles are occupied by women.[2] This is significant when compared with Australian society in general, where females make up only 46 per cent of the Australian workforce.

Across all the sectors, the presence of women is largely seen in education, health and aged care. But dioceses and parishes remain places where women contribute significantly. Around 78 per cent of all those employed in this part of the Church are women. Overall, within all Church organisations, women contribute not only through administrative roles but also as professionals, where 61 per cent of all professional roles are held by women… It may also surprise some to know that 47 per cent of the key advisors to the Bishops Conference are women.

Information about the National Centre for Evangelisation says the centre is ‘at the service of proclaiming the Good News of Jesus Christ in Australia.’ Indeed, the key purpose of evangelisation. But I wonder.

The women must be congratulated for their success. Perhaps it’s not just a boast. Behind the statistics lurks an imbalance of power and position between male and (lower-ranked) female executives, suggesting a correction is required – on moral grounds. I leave aside here a question of logic. Philosopher David Hume famously (and debatably) said you don’t get an ‘ought’ from an ‘is’. However so, there is no necessary logical connection between the factual observation of an imbalance and an alleged requirement to correct it. 

But let’s allow the moral prescription. What then? Well, if you rigorously work out the prescription, you arrive at female ordination and episcopal consecration. Is this in the mind of the author of this blog, and those cited as female leaders? On the evidence here, I don’t know. Female Catholic leaders elsewhere are more explicit.

How many men could or would want to be part of a feminist church? Or am I getting too far ahead of myself?