Tag Archives: Cardinal Pell

The absurdity of the case against Cardinal Pell

There have been many articles and videos demonstrating the absurdity (and injustice) of Cardinal Pell’s conviction, but none encapsulates that absurdity more succinctly than that by veteran journalist John Sylvester in Melbourne’s Age.

‘Pell was found guilty beyond reasonable doubt on the uncorroborated evidence of one witness, without forensic evidence, a pattern of behaviour or a confession.

‘It is a matter of public record that it is rare to run a case on the word of one witness, let alone gain a conviction.’

This is where Australian justice is

Fr Raymond J. d Sousa has demonstrated how corrupt Australian justice has become. Nobody is safe anymore.

Anomalies Abound in Cardinal Pell’s Abuse Trials

COMMENTARY: According to prosecutors, the very implausibility of the cardinal’s alleged crimes is an indication of their truth.

Does the very improbability of an accusation mean that it is more likely to be true?

That is the argument advanced by prosecutors in the case of Cardinal George Pell, and it indicates a dangerous dynamic in trials for some cases of historic sexual abuse. Convincing evidence leads to a guilty verdict; unconvincing evidence also leads to a guilty verdict.

Cardinal George Pell’s appeal of his convictions for sexual abuse was heard last week in Melbourne, and the proceedings illustrated how sex-abuse trials are different from other sorts of criminal trials. Those anomalies had a role in the false convictions of Cardinal Pell, which I have outlined previously in these pages.

The point here is not that there are wrongful convictions. The world learned that about Australian justice decades ago in the “dingo” case, dramatized by Hollywood, where parents were falsely convicted of killing their own child. Those false convictions resulted in part from public frenzy, a frenzy in which the religious beliefs of the family — Seventh Day Adventists — played a role.

Read on

Pell case reaction: a veneer of civilisation

Human rights lawyer Greg Barnes warns of where Australian society is heading in, THE CARDINAL PELL CASE: TRIUMPHALISM OVER PELL VERDICT SHOWS CIVILISATION JUST A VENEER.

Most of those supporting Cardinal Pell and condemning the guilty verdict have focused on the problems of evidence. Just as worrying as the failure of Victoria’s legal system which is supposedly based on the application of reason to the concrete evidence, is the mob mentality of those wildly rejoicing over the Cardinal’s dramatic demise. That rejoicing was a sign of civilisational decay. Barnes:

‘Reaction to the … case against Cardinal George Pell was characterised by frightening ignorance on the part of many about how our legal system works, an awful sense of triumphalism on the part of some media who have pursued Cardinal Pell for some years, and above all the spectacle of a lynch mob literally screaming at the guilty man out the front of Melbourne’s County Court.

Continue reading Pell case reaction: a veneer of civilisation

The left: Morally right defeats factually right

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a Democrat member of the US House of Representatives. She has achieved a deserved notoriety for her unblushing Green-Left views. Recently she was reported as saying, ‘I think there’s a lot of people more concerned about being precisely, factually, and semantically correct than about being morally right.’

Whether AOC (as she is referred to) was correctly quoted or not is not my concern here. The declaration certainly belongs to the AOC drift of mind. No, whoever said it, it is a recognizable emanation of the Green-Left mind. Being morally right for this mind, is being in line with Green-left dogma.

One does not arrive at Green-Left dogma by way of the operations of reason. Green-Left dogma is handed down from on high, where the swirling emotions of the Green-Left elite make the dogmatic declarations.

Continue reading The left: Morally right defeats factually right

‘Between coincidence and imitation: what would the Pell jurors have made of this?’

The Australian’s Cut and Paste rubric (11 April 2019) ran the following reports and comments together. I suggest the scrutiny of the Pell conviction has only just begun.

Keith Windschuttle in Quadrant magazine on the George Pell child sex abuse case, April 7:

… what is the probability that the evidence given in Australia was not an authentic account of what happened in Melbourne but, rather, a copy of a story that had already been aired in print and online? Here are the similarities between the American (2011 Engelhardt case) and the Australian allegations: Both cases of sexual abuse occurred in the sacristy after Sunday Mass. In both cases, the victims had been drinking wine they found in the sacristy … Both boys were made to kneel before the priest. Both boys were made to perform fellatio on the priest. Both the alleged victims were the only witnesses who testified for the prosecution in court … This does not mean the (Pell) accuser (Victim J) was deliberately making it up. He might have come to persuade himself the events actually happened, or some therapist might have helped him “recover” his memory.

The 2011 claim by a former Philadelphia altar boy, “Billy Doe”, may have been a fabrication, Ralph Cipriano, Newsweek, January 20, 2016:

Catholic Guilt? The Lying, Scheming Altar Boy Behind a Lurid Rape Case

Priests, altar boys and wine — could this be a meme? CatholiCity review of the 2008 film Doubt, February 20, 2009:

The drama focuses on the question of whether Father Flynn (Philip Seymour 

Hoffman) is worthy of the admiration so easily extended to him by the altar boys … or is guilty, as suspected by Sister Aloysius (Meryl Streep), of being the worst type of predator … (It turns on) circumstantial evidence: Fr Flynn’s calling the young Donald Muller one day … to come to the rectory; the boy’s returning to class looking upset and with alcohol on his breath … When they confront Fr Flynn, the priest first expresses his indignation … and then gives a partial explanation. He called Donald over to speak about the young boy’s having drunk some of the altar wine earlier in the sacristy. He didn’t inform the sisters because he knew it would result in his being expelled from the altar serving corps.

There’s a long history of anti-Catholic stories about depraved priests and altar boys. American Greatness, Michael Walsh, August 15, 2018:

The priapic cleric has been a staple of creative pornography since Rabelais and de Sade, and the list of sins attributable to the popes alone would make a harlot blush.

But such stories may sometimes (or often?) be a reliable guide to an evil reality. RTE news, June 24, 2013:

A former Catholic priest, who confessed to sexually assaulting two altar boys in the sacristy of a Co Cork church over 20 years ago, has been imprisoned for 12 months.

Unanimous jury verdict in Pell’s case, December 11 last year:

Guilty.

Cardinal Pell: See for yourself how impossible the claims.

In my post Police interview shows accusations nutty and impossible, I describe what Cardinal Pell had to do to carry out the action the complainant accused him of. It was impossible. Peter Wales in his Quadrant article When a jury get it ludicrously wrong described the layers of garments to reach a similar conclusion. Today Quadrant Online follows up with a video for a visual demonstration of how nutty the complainant’s claims are. The video can be found on youtube under ‘The vesting of the Bishop for Pontifical Mass’. Here it is:

Is Madame Defarge satisfied?

Madame Defarge is implacable. While a heart beats in that cell, the knitting needles won’t be put away. They will be put away only when dripping with blood.

Talk of a lynch mob reminded me of Edmund Burke’s description of the mob that led the captured French King and Queen into Paris ‘amidst the horrid yells, and shrilling screams, and frantic dances, and infamous contumelies, and all the unutterable abominations of the furies of hell in the abused shape of the vilest of women.’ (Reflections on the Revolution in France.)

Certainly, many taking part in the destruction of George Pell will end up rotting in hell. But Australia’s first Catholic martyr won’t be there with them.

Cardinal Pell sentence: A judicial farce

The sentence of Cardinal Pell has, as expected, sent Australia’s media sewer rats scurrying from their dark infectious holes, crawling over each other to repeat Judge Kidd’s most inflammatory comments.

But it is all a farce.

For one thing, the inflammatory comments are based on a conviction vigorously disputed by appalled legal people around the world. What sort of a dodgy legal system does Australia have?

I wonder how Judge Kidd felt while he was uttering his comments, knowing that Cardinal Pell’s conviction rested on the most flimsy evidence, that he was sentencing an innocent man to jail, perhaps to die in jail, and he was giving support to Australia’s implacable religious and political bigots.

This most egregious miscarriage of justice has not finished by a long shot. Indeed, it is a major event in Australian history and will be examined ceaselessly.

When all the stakeholders are gone and balanced historians examine the evidence, the real scoundrels will appear to take their place in nation’s rogues gallery.