Category Archives: Religion

Myths about Clerical Abuse

Top 10 Myths About Clergy Abuse in the Catholic Church

Psychology Today, Aug 01, 2019

Sexual abuse perpetrated by Roman Catholic priests has been headline news for years. But even with so much press attention, there are many commonly accepted myths about this issue. Remarkably, evidence-based research doesn’t always receive attention, while sensationalized stories that create a particular—but sometimes false—narrative do. This ultimately misinforms and harms the public—not to mention efforts to keep kids safe in and outside of the Church.

As we approach the year anniversary of the recent uptick in media attention due to the release of the Pennsylvania grand jury report (as well as the now-former Cardinal McCarrick abuse allegations), let’s review the top 10 myths about clerical abuse in the Catholic Church. 

Myth 1: Sexual abuse is more common among Catholic priests than other groups of men.  

About 4 percent of Catholic clerics had credible or substantiated accusations of child sexual abuse of minors (both prepubescent children and postpubescent teens) during the last half of the 20th century (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, 2004, 2011). Research data, although from limited small scale studies, finds the prevalence of clerical abuse among non-Catholic religious communities consistent with the Catholics. If you review insurance claims against Church communities for sexual victimization perpetrated by their clerics, you’ll find that that there is no difference between Catholic and non-Catholic groups (Zech, 2011).

Read on…

My Status – Where I am up to

FOR THE TIME BEING, I am consumed with reading and research for the final third of my novel, TIMES OF DISTRESS, the first book in my Winterbine Series. I have little time for other writing which explains why most of my posts on my two websites are links (sometimes with an introduction) to essays or comments I feel are of particular interest.

I will add to my important section on Cardinal Pell as soon as I have time.

I have recently opened a Facebook page for The Edmund Burke Society – Australia. I would really appreciate it if you would give it a like. The more likes I have, the more coverage the page gets. Many thanks.

Islam, realism and the Church

By William Kilpatrick, The Catholic Thing, 7 January 2020

It’s bad enough that the leftist media peddle the nonsense that Islam is a religion of peace and the conflict between the the Western and Islamic worlds is due to the warmongering of the bigoted West. In this, more than most leftist agendas, the left’s mass manipulation has been outstandingly successful. That, as I say, is bad enough. But to hear the hierarchy of the Catholic Church running such pernicious revisionism is almost too much to bear. William Kilpatrick states a few incontestable truths for those still in possession of their reason. Worse, perhaps, is that this culpable revisionism signals the Marxist takeover of the Church and the Pope’s hatred of the West.

In comments last year, Marcello Pera, a prominent Italian intellectual and non-believer, criticized Pope Francis for “openly going against tradition, doctrine, and introducing inexplicable innovations, behaviors and gestures.”

A philosopher of science, former president of the Italian Senate, and close friend of Pope Benedict XVI, Pera asserted that Francis had turned Catholicism into “a Church so outgoing that it can no longer be found anywhere.”

In an earlier 2017 interview with Il Mattino, Pera was even more outspoken.  In answer to a question about “indiscriminate” welcoming of migrants to Europe, he replied: “Frankly, I do not get this pope, whatever he says is beyond any rational understanding.  It’s evident to all that an indiscriminate welcoming is not possible:  there is a critical point that can’t be reached.”

Read on…

The incredible kid

The following is on The Freedoms Project blog. Recommended reading.

Just how ‘credible’ was The Kid’s testimony against Pell? [What follows is hard-going but I recommend you read it all and get to the end. The truth is revealed.]

I’ve been poring over the publicly available information on the Pell case. There is the transcript of the appeal verdict, Pell v The Queen [2019] VSCA 186 (21 August 2019). There is the less reliable book by Louise Milligan. There are news reports from the committal hearing, but there is no direct testimony, as the transcript of the trial is not available. The appeal verdict is the most useful, since it contains actual and paraphrased evidence on the most contentious aspects of the testimony. [Note that direct quotes from the appeal judgement will be in parentheses, have a paragraph number and be in italics – any added emphasis is mine.]

Read on…

Catholics sing carols for Cardinal Pell

Christmas Eve carolers for Cardinal Pell gathered at Melbourne prison

Ed Condon/CNA 26 December, 2019

A group of local Catholics gathered outside Melbourne prison on Christmas Eve to sing carols for Cardinal George Pell, currently incarcerated in the facility, and to pray for him, as well as the other inmates and prison staff.

At 8pm on December 24, about two dozen local Catholics gathered outside Melbourne Assessment Prison on the west side of the city center to sing Christmas carols and to pray for the cardinal and others in the jail.

One of the singers, John McCauley told CNA that “We just wanted the Cardinal to know he was loved and remembered at Christmas.” The songs included traditional carols like O Come All Ye Faithful and Once in Royal David’s City, as well as Australian favorites like The Three Drovers. Singers wrote messages of support and Christmas greetings in a copy of the carol book, which was left for Pell at the prison’s front desk.

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Dave Cullen – a reconversion story

This year I discovered Dave Cullen’s youtube videos on Ireland – on the collapse of the Irish Nation and its culture. I have provided the links to many of his videos because of his clear articulation of the issues and because his defence of Irish culture highlights in microcosm the Marxist agenda of undermining all western nations. Ireland is a cut and dried case of the Marxist attempt to break up a nation and its people – to cause them to disappear in a replacement strategy in a borderless world.

Dave says his ideas about nation and culture have matured over recent years in a forced assessment of his beliefs. His is not the only story of someone becoming conscious of the poison and incoherence of the leftist (meaning Marxist) gospel. He came from a position of atheism, swallowing all the ideas of a materialist philosophy, to understanding in a Burkean sense what it means to be a nation, to be a people. Central to this awakening was the realisation that religion, belief in a transcendent being, is central.

He has come to see that nations collapse when they reject the transcendent and its established order. He discusses his awakening in ‘Rediscovering Faith: My Journey Back To Christianity’. He articulates that journey with his usual clarity.

Evelyn Waugh's 'Love Among the Ruins'

Peace in a Plastic World

By Joshua Hren, First Things, 12 March 2019

Western secular culture “is a kind of hothouse growth,” Christopher Dawson wrote—an artificial culture that shelters us from “the direct impact of reality.” Neither birth nor death in secular societies occasions confrontation with ultimate realities. Rather, each brings us “into closer dependence on the state and its bureaucracy so that every human need can be met by filling in the appropriate form.” Evelyn Waugh’s Love Among the Ruins: A Romance of the Near Future dramatizes this sheltering. In this novella, “junior sub-official” Miles Plastic does clerical work for the “Department of Euthanasia” in a dystopian state. Plastic, whose surname epitomizes artificiality and malleability, ensures that those in line for a happy death do “not press ahead of their turn,” and adjusts “the television set for their amusement.” Although “a faint whiff of cyanide sometimes gave a hint of the mysteries beyond,” Plastic is content to empty the waste basket and brew tea for the patients. 

Because the “services” offered by the Department of Euthanasia are “essential,” Plastic has no feast on “Santa Claus Day” (December 25). After work he walks to the hospital to visit his lover Clara, who is with child, and finds “the hall porter . . .  engrossed in the television, which was performing an old obscure folk play which past generations had performed on Santa Claus Day, and was now revived and revised as a matter of historical interest.” The porter’s interest, Plastic supposes, is “professional,” for the show “dealt with maternity services before the days of Welfare.” The porter cannot look away from “the strange spectacle of an ox and an ass, an old man with a lantern, and a young mother.” “‘People here are always complaining,’” the porter says. “‘They ought to realize what things were like before Progress.’”

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The Crusades in Context

By Paul Stenhouse MSC PhD,

Annals Australasia 2007, Issue No.6

CURRENT wisdom would have it that ‘five centuries of peaceful co-existence’ between Muslims and Christians were brought to an end by ‘political events and an imperial-papal power play,’ that was to lead to a ‘centuries-long series of so-called “holy-wars” that pitted Christendom against Islam, and left an enduring legacy of misunderstanding and mistrust.’[1]

A school textbook, Humanities Alive 2, for Year 8 students in the Australian State of Victoria, carries the anti-Christian/anti-Western argument further:

Those who destroyed the World Trade Centre are regarded as terrorists… Might it be fair to say that the Crusaders who attacked the Muslim inhabitants of Jerusalem were also terrorists?[2]

Muhammad died in Medina on June 8, 632 AD.

The first of the eight Crusades to free the Holy Places in Palestine from Muslim control, and offer safe passage to the Holy Land for Christian pilgrims, was called only in 1095. At the risk of sounding pedantic, the period in question is not ‘five centuries’, but four hundred and sixty-three years; and those years, we contend, were not characterized by ‘peaceful co­existence’.[3]

Continue reading The Crusades in Context