Category Archives: Culture

REVIEW Tony Abbott book

Just repeating that I have received a review for TONY ABBOTT AND THE TIMES OF REVOLUTION:

‘IF YOU WONDER how we got to where we are on the shifting sands of political correctness (and who doesn’t) this book is for you. Gerard Charles Wilson, author of Prison Hulk to Redemption (2015) is the kind of biographer who is a more interesting than his hero Tony Abbott (see James Boswell, Laird of Auchinleck and Sam Johnson, Doctor of Bolt Court, off Fleet Street)…

‘Wilson’s work may not necessarily commend itself to left-wing Honi Soitistes, but it should be on the library shelves of all Catholic universities and senior schools for its corrective attitude to the student politics of the last century and this one.’

Read the full review HERE.

Update of the Abbott book

I have completed a six-month update of TONY ABBOTT AND THE TIMES OF REVOLUTION.

In addition to the review received (see recent blog), I had feedback that the book was unnecessarily long.

I have removed all text not directly related to the book’s three intertwined themes: the character of former Prime Minister Tony Abbott as displayed in his fearless no-holds battle with the far-left radicals at Sydney University (1976-1980); what it means to be a philosophical conservative in a leftist world; and the author’s critique of the student rebellion and the radicalism driving it. The author lived through the tumultuous years of the 1960s and 1970s revolution.

TONY ABBOTT AND THE TIMES OF REVOLUTION is as much about the author as about Tony Abbott.

Pell case reaction: a veneer of civilisation

Human rights lawyer Greg Barnes warns of where Australian society is heading in, THE CARDINAL PELL CASE: TRIUMPHALISM OVER PELL VERDICT SHOWS CIVILISATION JUST A VENEER.

Most of those supporting Cardinal Pell and condemning the guilty verdict have focused on the problems of evidence. Just as worrying as the failure of Victoria’s legal system which is supposedly based on the application of reason to the concrete evidence, is the mob mentality of those wildly rejoicing over the Cardinal’s dramatic demise. That rejoicing was a sign of civilisational decay. Barnes:

‘Reaction to the … case against Cardinal George Pell was characterised by frightening ignorance on the part of many about how our legal system works, an awful sense of triumphalism on the part of some media who have pursued Cardinal Pell for some years, and above all the spectacle of a lynch mob literally screaming at the guilty man out the front of Melbourne’s County Court.

Continue reading Pell case reaction: a veneer of civilisation

The measure of an Outstanding Liar

It surely cannot be disputed that the measure of an outstanding liar is the degree of successful deception. The greater deception – the greater the credibility achieved – the more estimable the liar’s success. Credibility is what the great liar aims for. If a liar projects unquestioned credibility without any independent proof for his claims, then that’s without doubt scaling the pinnacle of successful deception.

A man is to be applauded who can lie so convincingly that a great part of a country’s population is sucked in and tricked into ignoring the total lack of hard evidence for his claims.

The march of cultural Marxism in Catholic schools

It is an ironic coincidence that I came across a Cath News report about four Catholic girls’ schools in Brisbane dumping traditional language to adopt inclusive language in religious matters directly after posting my review of INFILTRATION: THE PLOT TO DESTROY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH FROM WITHIN.

The great big thicked-soled jackboots of cultural Marxism have clearly stomped their way into Catholic education.

The schools reportedly dumping traditional Church language and adopting ‘inclusive’ language are All Hallows’ School Brisbane, Loreto College Coorparoo, St Rita’s College Clayfield and Stuartholme School Toowong. These are the smartest Catholic schools that parents can send their daughters to. The privilege would cost them buckets of money.

Continue reading The march of cultural Marxism in Catholic schools

When SOMEONE you know is murdered

The news report this week of someone shot dead in their garage hardly penetrated my consciousness, so used are we to the reporting of such gruesome events. A couple of days later, I received an email from a friend in Queensland with nothing more than a link. I followed the link and found to my horror that the man shot dead was Dr Luping Zeng whose skin cancer clinic I have been attending for the last six or seven years.

One can only grasp the horror of the killing of an innocent person when you have known them so well.

Dr Zeng was unfailingly polite in his manner and supremely professional in his work. His family will be devastated, but hardly more than his many patients and colleagues at the Watford clinic.

It is difficult to comprehend that a 17-year-old has been arrested for Dr Zeng’s murder. What was the 17-year-old doing with a gun? And why did he think he had to use it on a much older small man whom he could have manhandled out of his way?

Where is this taking us?

Many people my age are asking the same question.

Who would watch the oscars?

The Oscars are on. But who would want to watch preening parading women bursting out of their scant frocks and waving #metoo flags? Who would want to witness the vulgarity, the squealing, and the political rants from actors whose thinking processes have not advanced beyond kindergarten? The number of talented actors who have made jerks of themselves in recent years through their puerile political opinions is disillusioning to put it mildly. Think of Robert de Niro.

In the beginning the Oscars was an elegant affair with actors maintaining dignity, letting their performances speak for them. The women were stunning, but modest, and the men handsome and reserved. They preserved the mystery of the film star. But all that has been shattered.

Hyping Women’s cricket

The Australian ran another laudatory piece this morning about women’s cricket, namely about the final ODI between Australia and New Zealand. Australia won and thereby won the series. I saw the highlights on different news broadcasts. Keep in mind that the broadcaster always shows the best and most exciting action.

A highlight in yesterday’s final was Ellyse Perry’s maiden century in the one-day game which reporter Andrew Capel called ‘superb’. At least, he did not make the absurd comparison between Perry and one of the greats of the men’s game Keith Miller – as has been done. I made the following comment:

Let’s pretend that the standard of the final was above schoolboy 16-year-olds and add a whole lot of hyperbole about the performances.

It took 5 hours but The Australian did evenutally print my comment among unstinting praise for the girls and the game, one (a female) saying ‘Wish we had a bloke as good as her in the Aussie men’s team.’

Indeed, I’m all for giving Perry a run in the men’s test team to see how she would go against a Mitchell Starc 150 kph screamer swinging in the air and jagging off the pitch instead of the tame lot she batted to a shortened boundary. That would be a dose of reality. But with truly talented batsman Phil Hughes in mind, would they really risk it? Or would the postmodernist fantasy world we live in defeat the risk?

Feminists are unstoppable. They’ve captured the world of sport reducing former (male) champions to cringing superlatives about female performance. I’m interested to hear how much those lucky female cricketers who make it to ‘professional’ status are paid. That will give us a good idea of the dream time we’re in.