Category Archives: Culture

Who would watch the oscars?

The Oscars are on. But who would want to watch preening parading women bursting out of their scant frocks and waving #metoo flags? Who would want to witness the vulgarity, the squealing, and the political rants from actors whose thinking processes have not advanced beyond kindergarten? The number of talented actors who have made jerks of themselves in recent years through their puerile political opinions is disillusioning to put it mildly. Think of Robert de Niro.

In the beginning the Oscars was an elegant affair with actors maintaining dignity, letting their performances speak for them. The women were stunning, but modest, and the men handsome and reserved. They preserved the mystery of the film star. But all that has been shattered.

Hyping Women’s cricket

The Australian ran another laudatory piece this morning about women’s cricket, namely about the final ODI between Australia and New Zealand. Australia won and thereby won the series. I saw the highlights on different news broadcasts. Keep in mind that the broadcaster always shows the best and most exciting action.

A highlight in yesterday’s final was Ellyse Perry’s maiden century in the one-day game which reporter Andrew Capel called ‘superb’. At least, he did not make the absurd comparison between Perry and one of the greats of the men’s game Keith Miller – as has been done. I made the following comment:

Let’s pretend that the standard of the final was above schoolboy 16-year-olds and add a whole lot of hyperbole about the performances.

It took 5 hours but The Australian did evenutally print my comment among unstinting praise for the girls and the game, one (a female) saying ‘Wish we had a bloke as good as her in the Aussie men’s team.’

Indeed, I’m all for giving Perry a run in the men’s test team to see how she would go against a Mitchell Starc 150 kph screamer swinging in the air and jagging off the pitch instead of the tame lot she batted to a shortened boundary. That would be a dose of reality. But with truly talented batsman Phil Hughes in mind, would they really risk it? Or would the postmodernist fantasy world we live in defeat the risk?

Feminists are unstoppable. They’ve captured the world of sport reducing former (male) champions to cringing superlatives about female performance. I’m interested to hear how much those lucky female cricketers who make it to ‘professional’ status are paid. That will give us a good idea of the dream time we’re in.

Some Reflections on the 1960s

Most Australians born after 1970 could not be blamed for acquiring the impression that the 1960s was one long party of sexual abandonment, drunkenness, the defiance of authority, the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, British pop, anti-Vietnam protests, marijuana, hippies, flower-power and so on in that colourful style. One saying is that if you remember the 1960s, you were not there. A witty comment, but the small number abusing themselves to the state of memory loss are all long dead and in no position to make that boast. I can report first-hand, however, that this picture of widespread youthful abandonment is fanciful, designed to impress those who could not know better.

In July 1960, I turned fourteen. I was in my second year of secondary school. My father carried his camera around with him, ever at the ready to shoot photos of his adored children. We have thus a pictorial record of those years when five of my parents’ six children were in their teens.

Continue reading Some Reflections on the 1960s

Publishing falls to the left

Ideologues Captured the Canadian Publishing Industry

In 2016, when I enrolled in the Master of Publishing program at Simon Fraser University’s Vancouver, B.C. campus, I had expected to find an industry of like-minded professionals who shared my love of the written word. And I did indeed meet many such colleagues. But I also got a glimpse into an industry that has become politicized to an extent that I scarcely could have imagined.

Publishing is not a career one chooses for the money. Nearly all areas of the industry are suffering economically. But since embarking on this course of study, I’ve found myself confronting challenges that have nothing to do with money. Regular Quillette readers will be aware that political and ideological forces have constrained the range of acceptable content in artistically and academically rarified fields such as creative writing (including poetry), media studiesmusic and performance art. What might be less appreciated is the manner by which these same forces are exerting pressure on the more mainstream area of publishing…

Read on…

A reminder of getup!’s manipulative power

Mike Seccombe wrote a detailed account in The Saturday Paper (28 Oct 2016) of GetUp!’s stunningly successful tactics in the 2016 federal election which saw some key Liberal MPs lose their seats. Seccombe and The Saturday Paper are entrenched on the left. They would rather choke than say anything complimentary about those on the ‘hard right’. Seccombe’s piece is uncritical and its tone is of admiration. Nothing about the unconscionable merciless lies and manipulations that mark GetUp!’s campaigns against conservatives. Nevertheless, as far as it goes, his report provides a stark warning for conservatives in the coming federal election, said to be in May. Unless conservatives formulate strategies to check GetUp!, there’ll be a wipe-out. Australia will be given up to the far-left and the Orwellian world they tirelessly impose on the people under the guise of ‘fairness and democracy’. The echoes of the 1930s are on the left, not on the right. Below are the relevant passages from Seccombe’s report.

The available evidence shows…that the conservative parties lost the ground war [in the 2016 federal election]. Their opponents outgunned them when it came to directly interacting with voters in vulnerable seats. They actually talked to the people.

The GetUp! campaign was something unprecedented. It was by far the biggest, best-organised campaign run by an organisation not directly affiliated with a party.

Continue reading A reminder of getup!’s manipulative power

Jacinta nampijinpa price – celebrate, don’t hate

On Australia Day, celebrate don’t hate.

With Nyunggai Warren Mundine and Jacinta Nampijinpa Price, the Aboriginal community have at last some enlightened leadership. Instead of spouting the postmodernist/identity rhetoric that only achieves enmity, Warren and Jacinta are facing the concrete issues of their people while building bridges with the rest of Australia most of whom want to see Aboriginals flourish in the land Australia has become since 1788. They offer an antidote to the poison of radical European philosophy that pretends to describe the circumstances of Aboriginals and prescribe the steps for their salvation. Below is Jacinta’s Price’s moving account of her terrible suffering while growing up and of her accusations against the hypocrites who abandoned her in their self-indulgence. What she suffered is unimaginable for most of us. Despite the suffering, she saw the good in people and in her country. She saw the road to the inheritance her country built and offers to its people. She wants to take her community along this road.

Jacinta Nampijinpa Price Australia Day January 26, 2019

” Not once! Not one time have I seen The Greens or labor speak out, not once have I seen you Indigenous cohorts speak out! Not once! You have never spoken out about stopping the violence, stopping the alcoholism, stopping the child abuse and sexual assault, no, you just want to talk about how “White man” has some how oppressed you. Oppressed you? Excuse you! Most of you leading the pack are well educated, had opportunities some of us only dare dreamed about, you manipulate the mobs, especially the ones less educated or fortunate for your own selfish white hating reasons! Shame on you! Shame shame shame!

Continue reading Jacinta nampijinpa price – celebrate, don’t hate

Waugh on the merits

Arthur Evelyn St. John Waugh was born in 1903 to upper-middle-class Anglicans who lived in a suburb of London. He attended a boarding secondary school (Lancing College), read history at Oxford, published his first book (a biography of the painter Dante Gabriel Rossetti) at age twenty-four, then his first novel a year later. Waugh married that same year (1928), divorced after two years, and converted to Catholicism. After the first marriage was declared null, he married a Catholic by whom he had seven children. He served honorably but ineffectively as an infantry officer in World War II, and was to publish thirteen novels, as well as seven travel books, three biographies, a volume of autobiography, and numerous essays and book reviews. Lionized in the 1920s as a trendy man of fashion, he became increasingly conservative in politics and churchmanship and notorious for his truculent contempt for the sham enthusiasms of modernity. He died on Easter Sunday, 1966, at his house in Somerset. Read on…

Soros – the end point was never homosexual marriage

The money behind the transgender movement

Billionaire George Soros opens his wallet to transform America

Three years ago (2013), a Supreme Court ruling paved the way for gay marriage.

After it, the mainstream media had one question: What was next for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender movement? They had, after all, won the big fight. In addition, many corporations had adopted policies barring discrimination based on sexual orientation, and two of America’s most watched shows at the time “Modern Family” and “Glee” featured openly gay characters.

“I really do believe [the Supreme Court ruling] is the domino that is going to tip over the rest of the dominoes,” Wilson Cruz, an LGBT activist, told CNN at the time. “Do not get in the way of this train, because it will run you over.”

To ensure things ran full-steam ahead, billionaire George Soros, through his Foundation to Promote Open Society, dedicated at least $2.7 million to the cause that year, according to his tax returns.

Some Republicans at the time mistakenly thought the LGBT movement had reached its pinnacle, that the culture wars had ended. They thought the party could now focus on fiscal concerns, which weren’t nearly as divisive.

But that was foolish — the LGBT movement was just getting fired up, and Soros-affiliated groups were already plotting their next prize. Read on…