Category Archives: Literature

Reader review of In This Vale of Tears

By Millicent on Goodreads

I don’t usually review books but I was lucky enough to win this book through Goodreads so I thought I would share just a few small thoughts on it.

I really enjoyed In This Vale of Tears, it is not usually the type of book I would read but I thought perhaps it was time to expand my book horizons, and I’m glad I did.

The characters where all interesting and developed well and I found myself really putting myself in their situations regardless of if they related to me or not. In saying that though, although it is heavily themed with Catholicism, you find much more out of it than just religion, as I think most of the issues that the characters are dealing with, most people would be able to relate to.

The imagery was beautiful and it was a reminded to me that I should be reading more books set in Australia.
Overall an enjoyable read!

Jane Austen’s vigorous defence of the novel

 For many years Northanger Abbey was the only Jane Austen novel (of those published) that I neglected. It was my least favourite. And I don’t know why when I look back. It was probably the impression I gained from reading it as a school boy. When I eventually became inspired enough to pick it up, prompted by one of its television productions, I was surprised to find how modern it was in its depiction of the relations between young men and women.
 
Few males would not know what a flirt is like and the manipulative tricks she can get up to.  Such a flirt was no different in Jane Austen’s day, it seems. In Isabella Thorpe she has depicted the type exactly – and satirised her mercilessly.

Continue reading Jane Austen’s vigorous defence of the novel

Romance and marriage in Sense and Sensibility

It has always intrigued me that feminists have claimed Jane Austen for their own. Even a brief study of Jane Austen’s books and her background would reveal a woman devout in her Christian faith and in unwavering acceptance of the society she was born into. Of course, that did not stop her satirising people in that society or of highlighting the social faults she perceived. Indeed, there has hardly been a more brutal satirist of human foibles and weaknesses in all of English literature.   She especially targeted people who were pompous, hypocritical, obsequious, nasty and selfish – all in the context of her late 18th and early 19th century English society. Continue reading Romance and marriage in Sense and Sensibility

Let’s talk about Austen and Dickens!

Two posts in one day! I am outdoing myself. But I had to mention a writer’s website that I came across today via a link on the Jane Austen Centre newsletter. Due to the all-consuming effort to finish the first book of my family history series I usually I don’t have time to give such emails more than a glance. One of the links ‘Let’s talk about Jane Austen’ caught my eye and brought me ultimately to one of the most interesting writer’s website I have seen.

The website is Books and Things run by a young writer Katie Lumsden who describes herself as a  ‘writer, blogger, vlogger (?), booktuber and until recently…played Kitty Bennett at the JAC.’ She writes professional engaging reviews about the staggering number of books she reads. She also gives talks about books, writing and writers on her booktube channel.

The JAC link was to a booktube talk about Jane Austen: Let’s talk about Jane Austen. I viewed it twice. When she mentioned she had done a similar talk on Charles Dickens, Let’s talk about Charles Dickens, I viewed that, too. Dickens and Austen are my favourite authors – together with Evelyn Waugh. The talks were given with an infectious enthusiasm. I really enjoyed them.

Books and Things is well worth the attention, especially for young writers.

 

Invitation to celebrate Teresa Waugh’s birthday

Dear Evelyn Waugh reader,

Mr and Mrs Evelyn Waugh invites you to a coming-out celebration for their daughter, Teresa, on Thursday 5 July, 1956.

The celebration is divided between two sites:

1) The Hyde Park Hotel, 7pm, for dinner.

2) The tents erected in Kensington Square Gardens for photographs, afternoon drinks and post-dinner dancing.

Non-vintage champagne for all except Evelyn. Any departures from the correct formal dress for men (billiard-table-green tweed suit and orange-and-white brogues) will be recorded in his private diary.

To accept the invitation, simply click the link:

Best wishes,

Duncan McLaren (soc. sec.)