Category Archives: Australia

Pell case reaction: a veneer of civilisation

Human rights lawyer Greg Barnes warns of where Australian society is heading in, THE CARDINAL PELL CASE: TRIUMPHALISM OVER PELL VERDICT SHOWS CIVILISATION JUST A VENEER.

Most of those supporting Cardinal Pell and condemning the guilty verdict have focused on the problems of evidence. Just as worrying as the failure of Victoria’s legal system which is supposedly based on the application of reason to the concrete evidence, is the mob mentality of those wildly rejoicing over the Cardinal’s dramatic demise. That rejoicing was a sign of civilisational decay. Barnes:

‘Reaction to the … case against Cardinal George Pell was characterised by frightening ignorance on the part of many about how our legal system works, an awful sense of triumphalism on the part of some media who have pursued Cardinal Pell for some years, and above all the spectacle of a lynch mob literally screaming at the guilty man out the front of Melbourne’s County Court.

Continue reading Pell case reaction: a veneer of civilisation

The measure of an Outstanding Liar

It surely cannot be disputed that the measure of an outstanding liar is the degree of successful deception. The greater deception – the greater the credibility achieved – the more estimable the liar’s success. Credibility is what the great liar aims for. If a liar projects unquestioned credibility without any independent proof for his claims, then that’s without doubt scaling the pinnacle of successful deception.

A man is to be applauded who can lie so convincingly that a great part of a country’s population is sucked in and tricked into ignoring the total lack of hard evidence for his claims.

When SOMEONE you know is murdered

The news report this week of someone shot dead in their garage hardly penetrated my consciousness, so used are we to the reporting of such gruesome events. A couple of days later, I received an email from a friend in Queensland with nothing more than a link. I followed the link and found to my horror that the man shot dead was Dr Luping Zeng whose skin cancer clinic I have been attending for the last six or seven years.

One can only grasp the horror of the killing of an innocent person when you have known them so well.

Dr Zeng was unfailingly polite in his manner and supremely professional in his work. His family will be devastated, but hardly more than his many patients and colleagues at the Watford clinic.

It is difficult to comprehend that a 17-year-old has been arrested for Dr Zeng’s murder. What was the 17-year-old doing with a gun? And why did he think he had to use it on a much older small man whom he could have manhandled out of his way?

Where is this taking us?

Many people my age are asking the same question.

Ongoing summary of Cardinal Pell’s unjust conviction

Jailed Cdl. Pell is victim of anti-Catholic witch hunt, critics maintain

MELBOURNE, Australia, February 28, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) — A number of commentators have denounced Cardinal George Pell’s prosecution and conviction of sexual assault as an anti-Catholic witch hunt instigated by media and police.

Pell was taken to a maximum security prison Wednesday and will be held there under protective custody until his March 13 sentencing on five convictions of sexually abusing minors, reported the Guardian.

The 77-year-old prelate was found guilty by a jury in December of sexual abusing two 13-year-old choir boys some 22 years ago, and could face up to 50 years in jail. His lawyers have filed an appeal they will pursue once Pell is sentenced.

Read on…

‘The case does not stand up’

George Weigel is the distinguished senior fellow of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he holds the William E. Simon Chair in Catholic Studies. He is the latest to highlight the incoherences in the Pell conviction.

On appeal, a panel of judges can decide that the verdict could not rationally have been reached on the basis of the evidence.

With the lifting of the trial judge’s order banning coverage of the conviction of Cardinal George Pell this past December on charges of “historical sexual abuse,” the facts can finally be laid out for those willing to consider them. (Disclosure: Cardinal Pell and I are longtime friends.)

Victoria police commenced an investigation one year before any complaints had been filed. During that investigation, the police took out newspaper ads seeking information about any untoward behavior with minors at the St. Patrick’s Cathedral in Melbourne —without any hint of such misbehavior having been received by the authorities.

Read on…


Hyping Women’s cricket

The Australian ran another laudatory piece this morning about women’s cricket, namely about the final ODI between Australia and New Zealand. Australia won and thereby won the series. I saw the highlights on different news broadcasts. Keep in mind that the broadcaster always shows the best and most exciting action.

A highlight in yesterday’s final was Ellyse Perry’s maiden century in the one-day game which reporter Andrew Capel called ‘superb’. At least, he did not make the absurd comparison between Perry and one of the greats of the men’s game Keith Miller – as has been done. I made the following comment:

Let’s pretend that the standard of the final was above schoolboy 16-year-olds and add a whole lot of hyperbole about the performances.

It took 5 hours but The Australian did evenutally print my comment among unstinting praise for the girls and the game, one (a female) saying ‘Wish we had a bloke as good as her in the Aussie men’s team.’

Indeed, I’m all for giving Perry a run in the men’s test team to see how she would go against a Mitchell Starc 150 kph screamer swinging in the air and jagging off the pitch instead of the tame lot she batted to a shortened boundary. That would be a dose of reality. But with truly talented batsman Phil Hughes in mind, would they really risk it? Or would the postmodernist fantasy world we live in defeat the risk?

Feminists are unstoppable. They’ve captured the world of sport reducing former (male) champions to cringing superlatives about female performance. I’m interested to hear how much those lucky female cricketers who make it to ‘professional’ status are paid. That will give us a good idea of the dream time we’re in.

Cardinal George Pell is on trial – so is Australian Justice

The trial of Cardinal George Pell for ‘multiple historical sexual offences’ is ongoing. If it were up to the media behemoth ABC and the collapsing Fairfax Group plus a legion of Pell-haters, there would be no trial of any sort. They already have Cardinal Pell convicted, and if they had their way he would be hanging from the steeple of St Patrick’s Cathedral.

They can rest assured. They have so poisoned the minds of Australians, particular in Victoria, there is little chance of justice prevailing. Indeed, there may be an even more satisfying outcome for the poisoners.

Behind the wall-to-wall denunciations of the Cardinal there are commentaries that provide compelling argument and evidence in his defence. The following are from Julia Yost of First Things. They should be read one after the other for the full effect.

Children of Desire

The Case Against Cardinal Pell

The facts about renewables

2GB’s Alan Jones and Liberal MP Craig Kelly yesterday (4 Feb) discussed the implications of Victoria’s power blackout last week. It was an informative discussion with detail that should be noted by anyone interested in the coming federal election. There’s a lot at stake. The ramifications of where the vote falls will be felt for years.

Without warning, 200,000 homes lost their power. My home was one of those. Seeing one’s computer suddenly black out and all appliances in the house die, provokes a strange unreal feeling. Victoria’s minister for energy Lily D’Ambrosio reportedly blamed the blackout on coal-fired power stations. That seems a strange claim when the Labor government in Victoria closed Hazelwood, the State’s coal-fired power station.

The cause of the sudden blackout, said Kelly, had nothing to do with coal-fired power stations. The problem was a drop in the wind. Given Daniel Andrew’s Labor government has forced Victorians to rely on wind and solar power for their energy, a drop in the wind always presented a risk theoretically. And so, what a primary school child could have deduced from the arrangements happened. The wind dropped on a very hot day and the system collapsed. What had happened in South Australia after the Labor Government’s destruction of their Whyalla coal-fired power station and their reliance on renewables happened in Victoria.

Continue reading The facts about renewables

it’s behaviour, not system

Lidia Thorpe, an Australian of (very diluted) Aboriginal ancestry (AOAA) told 3AW’s Neil Mitchel that talk about rape and murder in the indigenous community is a ‘diversion’ from the real issue. The rape and murder is ‘not a result of what we’re doing as Aboriginal people,’ she said, ‘it’s what the system is doing to our people.’ She then changed from the present tense to the past tense, from what happens now to what happened then – colonisation, ‘stolen children’, and so on.

Billions of dollars have been spent on Aboriginal disadvantage from the time of Charles Perkins in the 1960s to the present day. AOAAs like Lidia Thorpe have grown up in mainstream Australian society enjoying all the benefits of that society, benefits that in Burkean terms are our society’s rights.

Continue reading it’s behaviour, not system