Sticking up for free speech – a rich catalogue of the PC enemies

Holland is famous for its tolerance. But that tolerance these days covers everything the political correct dogma of the dominant political class approves. In real terms, everything that fits the Marxist agenda. Bert Brussen, CEO of the Postonline website, breaks from the mindless pc dialogue in his country to offer a courageous (a la Sir Humphrey Appleby), brutally candid (in typical Dutch style) an entertaining comment on speech to the extent it’s free in the Low Countries.

At last: resistance to the political correct whining…

Spineless Brugge caves in

Brugge (Bruges), in Flemish Belgium, is one of the most beautifully preserved medieval towns in Europe. The place with its magnificent Gothic buildings oozes Christian Europe. It is a must visit for anyone touring the Low Countries. While the visitor can wander around the town centre, silenced by the architectural beauty and the history it breathes, the town’s custodians act as if their cultural eyes have been ripped out.

The spinelss organisers of the Christmas market in Brugge, Belgium, have caved in to multiculturalism. They’ve changed the name from kerstmarkt (Christmas Market) to Wintermarkt (Winter Market). Their excuse is that ‘Christmas’ is offensive to other faiths.  We all recognise that for the snivelling excuse that is. We all know which faith Brugge’s organisers are grovelling in front of.

What a disturbing thing it is to witness the actions of those culturally gutted.

Writers are a boring bunch

In today’s Australian, Jack the Insider, entertains with an amusing swipe at those self-adsorbed people who call themselves writers.

I’ve always said I’d never go to writers’ festivals and true to my word, I never have. The mere thought of sitting in a room filled with writers fills me with a deep sense of anguish…

I’ll let you into a little secret. Writers, like actors, are sometimes vaguely interesting, often horrendously boring but always hopelessly, relentlessly self-absorbed. I have seen scribblers lapse into speaking of themselves in the third person, weighing up their remarks with extravagant gravity and no apparent sense of self-consciousness of the arses they are making of themselves.

Perhaps this why the Melbourne Writers Festival turned into a dog-and-pony show this year, featuring a bunch of non-literary mad escapades. Anything to avoid the ugliness of writers talking about themselves.

We’re an odd breed, to be honest. I like the company of people, don’t get me wrong, but I am just as happy on my own. Writing is a solitary affair with long hours strapped to a keyboard. Like most jobs it is often a chore and only occasionally joyful. Even the pleasure of a near perfect paragraph is one that goes unshared at least for the time being.    Read on…

UK Opens E-Passport Gates To CANZUK Countries

The movement, CANZUK, advocating free movement of citizens between Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom has passed another stage.

Nov 1, 2018 — 

As part of the 2018 budget, the UK government has revealed that citizens of Canada, Australia and New Zealand will be able to use e-passport gates to enter the United Kingdom, thereby easing movement of all visitors and permit holders at UK airports.

Chancellor Philip Hammond announced the plans to make it easier for citizens from Canada, Australia and New Zealand to come to the United Kingdom, either to visit or work, in a Budget to prepare the United Kingdom for its upcoming departure from the European Union. Read on…

The life and works of Edmund Burke: a commentary

PART ONE OF JESSE NORMAN’S BOOK, Edmund Burke: Philosopher, Politician and Prophet.
by Gerard Wilson

Jesse Norman has an impressive CV. His school education was at Eton. He went up to Oxford University where he was a resident of the illustrious Merton College. He came down with a B.A. He pursued his tertiary education at University College London (UCL) where he gained a master’s degree and then a doctorate in philosophy. He later taught philosophy at UCL and Birbeck College. He balanced his academic work with a directorship at BZW (part of Barclays) and a membership of the National Institute for Economic and Social research (NIESR). In 2010 he was elected as the Member of Parliament for Hereford and South Herefordshire, and as a member of the Treasury Select Committee.  In 2013 he was asked to join the Policy Board at 10 Downing Street.

Continue reading The life and works of Edmund Burke: a commentary

Jane Austen was a devout Christian

I have always found it curious that some feminists count Jane Austen in the pantheon of feminist heroines. I ‘ve heard it ever since feminism made it to the public arena way back in the 1970s. Her rubbishing of men in the form of Mr Collins in Pride and Prejudice and the beautiful exchange between Anne Elliot and Captain Harville in Persuasion are evidence of her anti-patriarchal credentials. These incidents, one was likely to think, prove Jane was just short of calling all males rapists. Perhaps that’s a little overstated. But you get the point.

I thought it strange because Jane was a devout Christian. For feminists of the Marxist sort, Christianity, the standard bearer of the patriarchy, is the deadly enemy of women. The strength of her religious feelings may not hit you in the face in her novels although she shows a distinct partiality towards the clergy despite her hilarious (and devastating) satire of clergyman Mr Collins. But her letters and other documentary evidence show the depths of her religious feelings and the sort of Christianity she subscribed to. More about that in another post.

So it was pleasing to see Vic Sanborn on her website (Jane Austen’s World) acknowledging Jane’s Christian faith in the announcement that ‘a “Praying with Jane” blog tour will begin October 31st’ on her website’. The blog tour ‘will showcase Rachel Dodge’s deeply felt first book, which centres around three prayers Jane Austen wrote’. Rachel Dodge’s book is Praying with Jane: 31 Days through the Prayers of Jane Austen. See Dodge’s website for more information about this spectacular demonstration of Jane Austen’s Christian belief.

The extreme left have prevailed in Wentworth

The voters of the federal seat of Wentworth have elected lesbian and climate-change activist Kerryn Phelps to take the place of Malcolm Turnbull in the federal parliament. When you consider Turnbull’s contemptible betrayal of the Liberal Party, confirming what we conservatives always thought of him, Phelps is the appropriate substitute.

As expected, the cry has gone up from pretend Liberals like John Hewson to drag the party back from the extreme right. The electorate has sent the Liberal Party a message, they say. The leftist media (the Fairfax and Guardian newspapers, and the green-left ABC) have begun recycling the call. There has been a clear message from the Wentworth results, though, and it’s not Hewson’s.

That message is, first, the former Liberal blue-ribbon seat of Wentworth has gone green-left feral and, second, the Liberal Party must work all the harder to protect its conservative character to deal with the befouling and degradation of Australian culture and society it suffers from the green-left coalition of the Greens and the Labor Party. It has to scrape off the debilitating leftist barnacles that have clung to it over the years. They have to tell people like John Hewson and Amanda Vanstone to shut up and get lost. Mealy-mouth approaches to the subversives are chicken-hearted and achieve nothing.

Reorganisation of Castle and Vale complete

I thought it better that I complete the adjustments to The Castle of Heavenly Bliss and In this Vale of Tears immediately. It was a matter of moving chapters either from one to the other, or to the first book which I will begin as soon as I have finished with Tony Abbott and the Times of Revolution. The reorganised editions of The Castle of Heavenly Bliss and In This Vale Tears are now available on Smashwords and Amazon.com

Tony Abbott and women

One of the constant slanders of Tony Abbott is that he is misogynist, doesn’t understand women, and works against their interests. This is despite the evidence speaking against this slander. As my book on Tony Abbott in which I refute this slander, is ready for publication, it is useful to include here the testimony of someone who knows Tony better than anyone else, his wife Margie. The following is an intervention Margie thought necessary during the 2013 federal election when the abuse reached its peak.

DURING my husband Tony’s 18 years as a Member of Parliament, I have never sought to enter the political fray or to publicly comment on issues.

As the girls were growing up, Tony and I worked hard to keep politics out of our home.

It was only at the last election, with the girls old enough to make their own decisions, we decided as a family to get involved and get out and campaign with Tony.

Continue reading Tony Abbott and women

Writer … and still in the fifties