All posts by gcw

The Catholic Novel is my genre of novel writing

Until now I have not felt the need to place my fiction writing into any particular genre, happy to let the novels speak for themselves. I adopted this attitude even though the three novels I have written so far certainly fit into the genre of the Catholic novel. 

I did not want to put any limitation on them. I was convinced that the stories’ framework would not inhibit the interest of the discerning reader. I was right about this. A number of readers said that the Catholic characters and circumstances did not prevent them from liking the novel. 

I have, however, changed my mind and think it best that I ‘come out’, so to speak.

First, I don’t see myself writing anything other than a novel in the genre. I have two novels planned, one already at 35,000 words, and they will be in this market. There is no point in hiding the fact. Indeed, it will link me explicitly to that market.

Second, there has been such a polarisation in Australian society that I feel I must make an explicit stand on where we are heading. The issues of ‘same-sex’ marriage, the Safe Schools program, and euthanasia are just a few of the issues that have, and will continue to polarise Australian society.

Third, in coming out, I would like to promote the market and encourage readers and writers to have a closer a look at the novels and novelists in the genre of the Catholic novel. To this end, I will make comments and provide links to writers and their works.

What does the genre of the Catholic novel entail? I have devoted a page to explaining what is it and who are its foremost proponents. 

Complete works of Evelyn Waugh in preparation

Evelyn Waugh’s writing is being comprehensively re-edited at last, more than 50 years after his death. 

Under the general editorship of his grandson Alexander Waugh, Oxford University Press, in association with the University of Leicester, where Waugh’s biographer Martin Stannard is based, is publishing a Complete Works, bringing together all of Waugh’s extant writings and graphic art, including much that has never been seen before (some 85 per cent of his letters, for example). It’s a huge undertaking and a thrilling prospect for all who love Waugh’s prose. Read on…

English is largely made up of the rules we don’t know that we know.

Have you ever wondered why many foreign speakers of English, as fluent as they may be, never entirely master the language? I can think of the Dutch. Many Dutch people speak English well, but there are few that speak it really well, like a native-speaker – unless they spent some time growing up in a English-speaking country. I exclude those. Mark Forsyth’s fascinating piece on BBC online explains why.

The language rules we know but don’t know we know

Over the weekend, I happened to go viral. Or rather a single paragraph from a book I wrote called The Elements of Eloquence went viral. The guilty paragraph went like this:

“Adjectives in English absolutely have to be in this order: opinion-size-age-shape-colour-origin-material-purpose Noun. So you can have a lovely little old rectangular green French silver whittling knife. But if you mess with that word order in the slightest you’ll sound like a maniac. It’s an odd thing that every English speaker uses that list, but almost none of us could write it out.”  Read on…

 

THE WITCH HUNTERS – released 15 August 2017

My new publication (15 August 2017) THE WITCH HUNTERS is available in paperback and ebook format on Amazon.com and in ebook format on smashwords.com. 

I am offering a special promotional price of $0.99 on smashbooks.com. The offer runs until after the Pell trial. For the special price, go to the title page and fill in the code SL98 after you have clicked the ‘buy’ button.

Revision of The Castle of Heavenly Bliss complete

I have finished the revision of The Castle of Heavenly and posted it on Smashwords here.  I will post it on Amazon shortly.  

THE REVISION: 
The intensive style and text revision was for a new paperback edition. Except for a small but important adjustment to the character of Estella in the final chapters and additional material to bring the story more into line with In This Vale of Tears, there has been no change to the story. The minor adjustment to Estella aimed to bring out character traits established in the previous chapters whose consequences did not emerge clearly enough in those final chapters. Because most of the story takes place in 1975, I  expanded the background of the vast social and political changes of the 1960s. This background is indispensable for the story. Otherwise, I trimmed the text and corrected faults of style as pointed out by reviewers and readers who were otherwise generous in their praise. I am confident the revisions present a far more polished and consistent story leading into In This Vale of Tears, the second book in what will now be at least a three-part series.

In This Vale of Tears featured novel for reading club

Caroline Chisholm Library’s Catholic Reading Club invited me to attend their March 31 meeting as the author of the month’s featured novel, In This Vale of Tears. I was delighted that my book had been chosen for discussion and equally delighted to attend the meeting. I was a little nervous, though, because I had not experienced this sort of literary ‘examination’ before. It would be embarrassing if nobody much liked my book!

I am aware that the themes of my novel and its Catholic setting are not to everyone’s liking.* But one may think I would be safe with the people in a Catholic Reading Club. Regretfully, it does not work that way. The paradox is that the members of a Catholic Reading Club are likely to be more discerning about a story of women in a female religious order than the general reader. Continue reading In This Vale of Tears featured novel for reading club

Reader comment Prison Hulk to Redemption

Comment: Barry Fitzgerald (Denham Court NSW)
I bought your book because I like the title Prison Hulk to Redemption, but did not read the review in the Annals. It is one of the few history books that I have read and do not recall being taught Australian history at school.

I have written about my ancestors since they arrived in Australia in the early nineteenth century, but in far less detail than in your book.

Before we left Sydney in 1936 to live on a property on the Darling Downs in Queensland, I can recall very few instances instances when fun was made of me because of my Catholic school uniform. However I can recall my aunts and uncles referring to problems they were having because they were Catholics. But after reading your book I am inclined to believe it was more to do with the economy and the belief that the English were a superior class to the Irish.

[The chapter] ‘Bit and Pieces’ is superb and reminded me of my childhood at Jimbour. Our exploits and adventures were not as daring.

Thank you for the opportunity to learn more about early Australia.

Reader review of In This Vale of Tears

By Millicent on Goodreads

I don’t usually review books but I was lucky enough to win this book through Goodreads so I thought I would share just a few small thoughts on it.

I really enjoyed In This Vale of Tears, it is not usually the type of book I would read but I thought perhaps it was time to expand my book horizons, and I’m glad I did.

The characters where all interesting and developed well and I found myself really putting myself in their situations regardless of if they related to me or not. In saying that though, although it is heavily themed with Catholicism, you find much more out of it than just religion, as I think most of the issues that the characters are dealing with, most people would be able to relate to.

The imagery was beautiful and it was a reminded to me that I should be reading more books set in Australia.
Overall an enjoyable read!